This podcast is a production of Jack Mountain Bushcraft Media. The Working Class Woodsman may or may not be a guest in this particular podcast episode and is not responsible for the content (especially for anything he might say when he's a guest).


We’re nearing the end of our spring 2019 Wilderness Bushcraft Semester. Today begins week 8, and we’re headed out for the final expedition of the course. This means you won’t hear from us for a few weeks as we’ll be off the grid. In this episode we talk about the realities of being consistent with media versus being a working guide. In short, we’re guides first and podcasters second, so our podcast and media will never be 100% consistent because we’re always headed off the grid for a few weeks at a time.

See you in a few weeks.

PHOTO: Guiding a trip on a previous course.

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There is no profanity used in this episode.


 
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This podcast is a production of Jack Mountain Bushcraft Media. The Working Class Woodsman may or may not be a guest in this particular podcast episode and is not responsible for the content (especially for anything he might say when he's a guest).


How to choose a wilderness immersion program is the topic for episode 69 of the Jack Mountain Bushcraft Podcast. Christopher and I discuss the three things a potential student should ask themselves and the ten things a student should look for in a school. Having run a such programs for over 20 years, I hate surprises. More specifically, I don’t like it when a student is surprised on a course by how it is run, what the content is, etc. They should know this coming in.

What a potential participant on a wilderness immersion program should ask themselves:

  • What are my interests? Mountaineering? Bushcraft? Nature study?
  • What are my goals? Professional training? Break from my life? Explore a new hobby?
  • How much time do I want to invest in the program?

What a potential participant on a wilderness immersion program should ask about a school they’re interested in:

  • Location of the program
  • Program length
  • Program format: full or part time, live on site or live nearby, etc.
  • Educational philosophy of the school. What are they trying to achieve?
  • Experience and background of the school and instructors
  • Course curriculum
  • Assessment system
  • Is there a religious or spiritual component
  • Does the school make untrue marketing claims
  • Do your research!

PHOTO: Group at Grand Pitch on the East Branch of the Penobscot at the end of a month-long canoe expedition course.

Kid-Friendly?
There is no profanity used in this episode.


 
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This podcast is a production of Jack Mountain Bushcraft Media. The Working Class Woodsman may or may not be a guest in this particular podcast episode and is not responsible for the content (especially for anything he might say when he's a guest).


Episode 68 of the Jack Mountain Bushcraft Podcast is about the assessment system we use for our immersion programs. Christopher and I discuss the role of assessment on a long-term program, the crucial role of academic study to learn deeply, and a true story that drives home the need to learn the scientific names of plants.

PHOTO: Turtle on the Aroostook.

Kid-Friendly?
There is no profanity used in this episode.

Links: The book mentioned in this episode.


 
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Google Play Music Link | Now Available On Google Play Music

 

This podcast is a production of Jack Mountain Bushcraft Media. The Working Class Woodsman may or may not be a guest in this particular podcast episode and is not responsible for the content (especially for anything he might say when he's a guest).


Episode 67 of the Jack Mountain Bushcraft podcast starts with a rant against how outdoor living was broken into two options by a tv writer in 2009: tactical or hippie. Then we talk about the Jack Mountain approach which is neither of those options; the experiential anthropological approach. We talk about how experience shapes a person and why it is an absolute necessity. We also talk about how we learn from cultures who have lived off the land for many generations and why they are better to model our behavior after than the flavor of the week celebrity culture that has infected the outdoor community like a virus.

PHOTO: From March 2019, Cree snowshoes against a blue sky near Ouje-Bougoumou, Quebec.

Kid-Friendly?
There is no profanity used in this episode.

Links: A few books mentioned in this episode. Remember to always check for used copies and earlier editions to save some money.


 
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iTunes Link | Play, Download Or Subscribe In iTunes
Stitcher Link | Play, Download Or Subscribe In Stitcher
Google Play Music Link | Now Available On Google Play Music

 

This podcast is a production of Jack Mountain Bushcraft Media. The Working Class Woodsman may or may not be a guest in this particular podcast episode and is not responsible for the content (especially for anything he might say when he's a guest).


Episode 66 of the Jack Mountain Bushcraft Podcast is about the challenges that come with the job of being a professional guide and outdoor instructor. While what we do can look idyllic from the outside, it’s not without difficulty. Christopher and I discuss 8 specific challenges that come with the job:

  1. You are never off duty.
  2. You are part of the group, but you have no peers.
  3. You have to make unpopular decisions for the good and safety of the group.
  4. You are a beast of burden.
  5. Time spent away from home and loved ones.
  6. The ever present danger of making your hobby into your job.
  7. You’re expected to know everything about everything, all the time.
  8. You are the social director for the groups you work with.

PHOTO: Christopher poling his EM White canoe on an Aroostook county river.

Kid-Friendly? Profanity In This Episode:
There is no profanity used in this episode.


 
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Google Play Music Link | Now Available On Google Play Music

 

This podcast is a production of Jack Mountain Bushcraft Media. The Working Class Woodsman may or may not be a guest in this particular podcast episode and is not responsible for the content (especially for anything he might say when he's a guest).


Episode 65 of the Jack Mountain Bushcraft Podcast, recorded on Halfway Day on the spring, 2019 Wilderness Bushcraft Semester course. We catch up with the students and get some of their insights, discuss Christopher’s love affair with his new (to him) canoe, and talk about possibly differentiating the spring and fall semesters in 2020, with the spring semester being focused on training wilderness canoe and fishing guides and the fall semester focusing on bushcraft and primitive living skills.

PHOTO: Christopher in his new EM White canoe.

Kid-Friendly? Profanity In This Episode:
There is no profanity used in this episode.


 
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Google Play Music Link | Now Available On Google Play Music

 

This podcast is a production of Jack Mountain Bushcraft Media. The Working Class Woodsman may or may not be a guest in this particular podcast episode and is not responsible for the content (especially for anything he might say when he's a guest).


Episode 64 of the Jack Mountain Bushcraft Podcast is about how all outdoor knowledge is local knowledge, and how the idea of a global expert is a myth. For the episode I was joined by old friend and frequent podcast guest Blake Towsley.

PHOTO: Allagash falls from the canoe, taken summer 2018.

Links:


 
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Is it still hunting (as opposed to shooting) if you use a drone to find game? Is it ethical? Is it legal? This is the topic of conversation in this mini episode, filmed on location, between Ed and Max, with Brian returning to the podcast to lend his thoughts as well. (We were in Brian’s workshop filming a video for the YouTube channel.)

You can check out UAV rules in New Hampshire pertaining to the use of drones being prohibited for hunting, fishing and trapping.

//CORRECTION!// IT IS LEGAL TO HUNT WITH WALKIE TALKIES HERE IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. However, there used to be a law that said you couldn’t drive deer with anything electronic. With cell phones it’s impossible to enforce that law. This is a good example of how difficult it is to write laws that stand the test of time with technology coming up with products that find loopholes.

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This podcast is a production of Jack Mountain Bushcraft Media. The Working Class Woodsman may or may not be a guest in this particular podcast episode and is not responsible for the content (especially for anything he might say when he's a guest).


For episode 63 of the JMB Podcast we gathered with the students on the current Wilderness Bushcraft Semester in the Guide Shack on a cool morning before heading down to the river. We check in with Jeremy and Anthony and get their perspective on the course, the realities of living outdoors, using hand tools, and how their experience is unfolding.

PHOTO: Anthony poling on the Aroostook river.


 
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This podcast is a production of Jack Mountain Bushcraft Media. The Working Class Woodsman may or may not be a guest in this particular podcast episode and is not responsible for the content (especially for anything he might say when he's a guest).


Episode 62 is about how to know a place. Part of what we teach on our immersion programs is how to be at home in the forest. This includes both academic and experiential components, which we discuss. We also talk about the Masardis glacier and give an update about our articulation agreement with the University of Maine at Presque Isle.

PHOTO: Ben Spencer poling on the Sebeois river.

Links:


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iTunes Link | Play, Download Or Subscribe In iTunes
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Google Play Music Link | Now Available On Google Play Music